Stay Salty

Be the salt & light of the world

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I don’t typically do this.
In fact, I go through great lengths to not bring my personal life into this blog. Unfortunately I need to use this blog as a medium to reach out for prayers.
My cousin Jillian is one of the must humble & upbeat people I know. Seriously. This girl always has a smile on her face. Even when she cries she smiles. Unfortunately she has great reason for tears over the past few years. Her grandfather died quite suddenly from cancer. My cousin Lisa, her older sister, passed away less than 2 years later after a decade long battle with cancer. The following year their father, my uncle, passed away…from cancer.
A year later Jillian’s family was blessed with a beautiful little boy Corey. It seemed that God had given her this miracle to bring joy back into her life after so much tragedy. For 2 years Corey has been the light of the family. He is so much like his mother, always smiling, always making others laugh.
Then a few months ago Corey started getting sick. At first no one knew what was causing it. Soon enough Jillian recognized the symptoms, she had seen her sister struggle through the same symptoms growing up. We all prayed that it wasn’t that, prayed that her assumptions were wrong, prayed for a miracle. Our prayers were not answered. 2 months ago Jillian received the verdict: Corey was diagnosed with Neuroblastoma, the same form of cancer that took the life of his aunt.
Since his diagnosis the doctors have removed his adrenal gland. He is being treated at the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. They are constantly running scans to see how far the cancer has progressed. Further testing has shown that it has spread to his shins. Due to his young age and the complicated nature of this form of cancer, chemotherapy is being put off as an absolute last resort as it can do more harm than good.
All that being said I’m here asking, begging, for all of you to share Corey’s story to reach out to others, to share in your churches…do all these things to lift him up in prayer.

I don’t typically do this.

In fact, I go through great lengths to not bring my personal life into this blog. Unfortunately I need to use this blog as a medium to reach out for prayers.

My cousin Jillian is one of the must humble & upbeat people I know. Seriously. This girl always has a smile on her face. Even when she cries she smiles. Unfortunately she has great reason for tears over the past few years. Her grandfather died quite suddenly from cancer. My cousin Lisa, her older sister, passed away less than 2 years later after a decade long battle with cancer. The following year their father, my uncle, passed away…from cancer.

A year later Jillian’s family was blessed with a beautiful little boy Corey. It seemed that God had given her this miracle to bring joy back into her life after so much tragedy. For 2 years Corey has been the light of the family. He is so much like his mother, always smiling, always making others laugh.

Then a few months ago Corey started getting sick. At first no one knew what was causing it. Soon enough Jillian recognized the symptoms, she had seen her sister struggle through the same symptoms growing up. We all prayed that it wasn’t that, prayed that her assumptions were wrong, prayed for a miracle. Our prayers were not answered. 2 months ago Jillian received the verdict: Corey was diagnosed with Neuroblastoma, the same form of cancer that took the life of his aunt.

Since his diagnosis the doctors have removed his adrenal gland. He is being treated at the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. They are constantly running scans to see how far the cancer has progressed. Further testing has shown that it has spread to his shins. Due to his young age and the complicated nature of this form of cancer, chemotherapy is being put off as an absolute last resort as it can do more harm than good.

All that being said I’m here asking, begging, for all of you to share Corey’s story to reach out to others, to share in your churches…do all these things to lift him up in prayer.

Filed under cancer sloan-kettering